Hate the messenger

April 1, 2008

communists.jpg

Should you really be handing out the Workers Vanguard at an anti-war rally in this outfit?  This is what I got when I typed “CCCP zip up” into Google. The first fucking link. The track jacket at the discount site costs $45.00 (without shipping) and (surprise) is not made in America.  Wow!  For that kind of money,  the average Cuban might consider staying in a Cuban hotel for one night.  Add to that, Kevin Federline was their company’s spokesman.   

And the turd under the nose look isn’t helping.

(h/t the non-Federline Kevin )

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8 Responses to “Hate the messenger”

  1. superdave524 Says:

    Communism was a really bad idea. Adam Smith said left alone economically, people will act in their own best interests, and competition will insure it’ll all be ultimately good. Karl Marx said capitalism is an evil, class-producing, misery inducing force and we all oughta speed up its demise to save the workers some pain. Lenin says, we’ll help speed up the demise of capitalism by having the State take over the means to production. Bad idea. Turns out that people who purchase goods and services know more about what they want than bureaucrats do.

    Now, competition and short-sided businessmen who don’t have the sense to understand what is actually in their longterm best interests DO cause a lot of unnecessary pain, hence some adjustments are indicated. No mainstream economic dude in America really thinks that government ought to get all the way out of the market (we don’t really want companies to be able to hire 10 year-olds to work in coal mines, do we?), though there’re plenty of arguments about where the line ought to be drawn. But the differences between Democrats and Republicans are essentially pretty small.

    American Communists in $45 USSR sweatjackets? Shoot, nobody in the old USSR could afford it. Turd-nose just needs to get laid.

  2. Quakerjono Says:

    Good skin, bad hair, needs conditioner, Daddy’s Dollar Communist.

  3. col Says:

    forgive them, for they know not what they do. when i was younger, i had a borderline commie phase too. i was an intern at the nation, in fact ($100/week stipend in NYC). but eventually i realized that if i ever wanted to move out of my parents’ house, i had to get a real job. then i started liking this ‘ol system of ours. it’s all a matter of perspective.

  4. John in IL Says:

    Turns out that people who purchase goods and services know more about what they want than bureaucrats do.

    Agreed.

    No mainstream economic dude in America really thinks that government ought to get all the way out of the market (we don’t really want companies to be able to hire 10 year-olds to work in coal mines, do we?)

    How many 10 year olds would be working in coal mines in America if all government child labor laws were rescinded today? I’d guess none. Here’s a good reason why.

  5. John in IL Says:

    Glad you got over it, col. I can’t quite picture you as an angry protester. You’ve come a long way, baby.

  6. superdave524 Says:

    Companies in the lowcountry routinely hire latinos who didn’t live here until very recently. When I was a magistrate-judge, I saw quite a few latinos who had no driver’s licenses and no SC permanent address, and whose last permanent address was not in ‘Merica. Many of them didn’t even know their local address (through interpreter: “It’s over near Adams Street. With a guy named Juan”). It’s pretty easy to believe that the latinos working at the sod farm were illegal immigrants. They work hard and cheap, and, if they aren’t permanent residents, it’d be hard for them to enforce any existing labor laws. It’s not legal to hire them, but since that law is hard to enforce, it appears to be violated by employers who are merely trying to optimize their bottom line. Maybe Americans don’t want to pick lettuce, but a lot of them would be happy with the construction jobs that latinos get in Ridgeland and Hilton Head. I don’t care a lot about immigration issues, generally, but it seems fair to compare employer conduct with unenforced laws to prospective conduct in the absence of laws. Child labor, minimum wage, pollution, safety standards, fair labelling and advertizing are all things that the public has an interest in, and which the market might not adequately handle without public regulation. But, as I’ve said, there is plenty of room for reasonable people to disagree.

  7. Jamie Says:

    She’s certainly got the Leninist scowl down to a T. (And note the capitalist cellphone in her jeans pocket!)


  8. Good point, John. A lot of people forget that the child labor laws are part of the Fair Labor Standards Act passed during the Depression, and that a big part of the reason for the laws was to get children out of the workforce so that more jobs were freed up for adults. It had less to do with child labor being wrong than it did with reducing competition.

    And there is a cure for this girl……tie her to a chair, tape her eyes open, and make her watch Ninotchka about twenty times. She’ll either go capitalist or lesbian, and at either rate, she will be ours.


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